April 22: Live – Allman Brothers Band, James Brown, Johnny Cash, Cheap Trick, Deep Purple, Bob Dylan, Peter Frampton

This week we’re coming to you LIVE from the hallowed fields of Coventry UK, in front of 20,000 screaming fans, for seven choice cuts from the 1001 Albums!

*audience screams*

The theme this week is LIVE ALBUMS. I’ve always lumped live albums into the same category as compilations, “unreleased material” and remix albums: i.e., inessential fluff padding out an artist’s catalogue and making some easy bucks from marks. This is, of course, mainly because of 90s bands treating the live album as bonus material or as a contractual obligation (Pulp and Marilyn Manson respectively come to mind). Yet back in the 60s and 70s – prior, of course, to VHS and DVD – the live album was a big deal. Are you ready to hear some?

*YEAAAHHH*

I can’t hear you, are you ready to hear some REVIEWS OF LIVE ALBUUUUUMS?

*YAAAAAAAASSSSSS*

The Allman Brothers Band, ‘At Fillmore East’

Initially, this sounds like a boring blues-rock album, except with two drummers (one is the fabulously-named Butch Trucks) and two lead guitarists. However, the album finds its groove in massively extended jams: one lasts 19 minutes, another lasts 23 minutes. It’s not just extended guitar soloing (well, not entirely…): the latter, ‘Whipping Post’, has some of the most interesting sections, while there is dramatically eerie organ and timpani concluding ‘Hot ‘Lanta’. It’s the sort of record where all the ingredients are among my least favourites – long jams, blues, jazz, drum solos – but I can see why this is so fondly regarded. The Allmans had barely put this one out when lead guitarist Duane Allman died, aged just 24.

James Brown, ‘Live at the Apollo (1963)’

The Godfather of Funk only appears on the list once, believe it or not: most of his best-known work was only released as singles. In 1963, he was part of the Famous Flames and still a soul singer, wowing a crowd of screaming teenage girls. The frenzied audience are the most distinctive feature of the album, but the band are on point: my favourite track here was ‘Think’, but the ten-minute ‘Lost Someone’, with well-timed call and response interplay with the crowd, shows a consummate performer with the audience in the palm of his hand. With great songs performed masterfully, this album flew by.

Johnny Cash, ‘At San Quentin’

I enjoyed ‘At Folsom Prison‘, and here Cash is in another prison, composing a song for the inmates which they enjoy so much that Cash and his band play it twice in a row. As with James Brown, the real pleasure here is in Cash’s rapport with his audience: his choice of songs and his between-song conversation keeps the inmates engaged throughout. Do you need both this and its very similar older brother ‘At Folsom Prison’, though? They’re both really good, but if I had to choose, it’d be the earlier album: this one ends with a boring Carter Family duet (‘There’ll Be Peace in the Valley’) and a version of ‘Folsom Prison Blues’ which is cut off after barely 60 seconds. Short on time, I listened to the original version, rather than the multi-disc legacy edition.

Cheap Trick, ‘At Budokan’

I knew hardly anything about Cheap Trick, but it seems that they were a power-pop/hard-rock quartet who performed cuts from their two previous albums in front of a hysterical Japanese audience for this album (although Robert Christgau reckons it was recorded on a soundstage with the audience track dubbed in). The first half is pretty routine hard rock, made to seem like a bigger deal by the ecstatic spectators. The second half varies the pace with a Fats Domino cover, a poppy hit of their own called ‘I Want You To Want Me’, and an almost all-chorus song called ‘Surrender’.  I don’t think this is essential but I can believe it’s the best Cheap Trick album.

Deep Purple, ‘Made in Japan’

Reluctantly persuaded to make a live album by their Japanese record company, Richie and the gang recorded this over three nights. The album’s a mixed bag. There is a great version of ‘Child in Time’ and an unbelievable version of ‘Smoke in the Water’. Then a song with a six-minute drum solo followed by a song where Ian Gillan is singing falsetto harmonies with Richie Blackmore’s guitar: both of these really test one’s patience. There’s only seven songs in 78 minutes, with an awful lot of soloing (guitar, organ and drums all get involved: sometimes the organist starts playing ‘Louie Louie’ or ‘Jerusalem’ instead). I think there’s probably a lot that I’d enjoy about Deep Purple, a favourite band of my dad’s, but this was almost certainly the wrong place to start.

Bob Dylan, ‘Live 1966 “The Royal Albert Hall Concert” The Bootleg Sessions Vol 4’

“Judas!” “I don’t believe you! You’re a liar!” This is a double album which starts off well for Dylan as he plays unaccompanied acoustic versions of tracks from incredible albums ‘Highway ’61 Revisited’ and ‘Blonde on Blonde’. The audience, however, are less keen on his second set, because it is, of course, the tour where Dylan went electric for the first time. For whatever reason, the Spotify version of the album edits out the particularly abrasive interactions with the audience (including the “Judas!” shout), but you can hear something’s off. The hostile delivery is most notable on a sour version of ‘Like A Rolling Stone’. An interesting recording of Dylan’s artistic peak, one of the most famous musical shifts in history, and how the audience reacted.

Alright, that’s all the albums this week…

*WE WANT MORE! WE WANT MORE*

(comes back out to review another album)

Peter Frampton, ‘Frampton Comes Alive’

Frampton was a very good-looking singer and guitarist with distinguished musical chops. By 1976, he’d made four largely-ignored albums, but this double live album proved to be the point where his career, um, came alive. It’s kind of hard to see what all the fuss was about: there’s an occasional interesting chord sequence, and the Sparky’s Magic Piano talkbox thing sounds fresh on its first appearance, but beyond that, it must have dated badly. First half is mostly anonymous soft rock, including ‘Baby I Love Your Way’. Second half is interminable solos (particularly on ‘Do You Feel Like I Do’ for thirteen minutes) and an atrocious Rolling Stones cover. It felt like I was listening to this forever (it’s 90 minutes long): I can’t see myself coming back to it.

There are loads more live albums on the list – this is just a sample (and of course I’ve already heard some, such as Nirvana’s ‘Unplugged in New York’).

Next week: Are you ready for the country? Well either way, we’ll be back listening to some of the finest albums in that genre.

Progress update: 485 listened to (48%), 516 remaining.

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Author: JT Wilson

Listening to all of the albums in the '1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die' book (2006 edition).

2 thoughts on “April 22: Live – Allman Brothers Band, James Brown, Johnny Cash, Cheap Trick, Deep Purple, Bob Dylan, Peter Frampton”

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